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    Light to the Rescue with CLUE

     

    February 20, 2020

     

    Can light make a difference in a crisis?

     

    Ever thought how lighting could help in a crisis or emergency?  Or how it could save someone’s life? This year we received more than 300 brilliant and creative entries showing how light can make a difference in a crisis.
     

    Community Lighting for the Urban Environment (CLUE) is an annual competition aimed at young and emerging lighting designers, challenging them to design meaningful projects for communities around the world.
     

    Supported by the Signify Lighting Academy, CLUE invites the aspiring designers to consider pressing societal issues and envision innovative design projects. This year’s competition theme was ‘Exploring the role of light in emergencies’.
     

    The task was to show how light can make a difference in places and situations where people feel vulnerable, such as conflicts, or times of disruption and environmental crisis. It also asked if there is a role for light to help prevent or manage a crisis?

    And the winners are…


    The top prize-winning project went to Clarissa Concilio from Denmark. Her project,‘Beskut’, seeks to improve the well-being of refugee children with sleep disorders. It’s not uncommon for such children to have nightmares or difficulties in sleeping or falling asleep. Often this is a consequence of the trauma they have experienced, and, in some cases, this can contribute to mental health issues such as PTSD, depression, and anxiety.

     

    Beskut is a toy that emits a beating red light (640nm) that relaxes the child and lulls them to sleep. It is the perfect toy to be given to children when they first arrive at a refugee camp. A gentle movement of the light, simulating a breath, relaxes the child, soothing anxiety and stress. When the child falls asleep, the movement stops (as measured by an accelerometer) and the light slowly dims down. When the child is awake or distressed, the light intensity increases to calm the child.

    Beskut, the winning project by Clarissa Concilio
    Beskut, the winning project by Clarissa Concilio of CLUE’s ‘Exploring the role of light in emergencies’
    The second prize went to Gabriele Gunady and Sang-Il Na from Victoria, Australia. The project, which is called ‘Call Out’, takes a fresh look at how survivors of a marine/aviation incident can attract the attention of rescue workers.

    The top of the balloon flashes an SOS signal at night and reflects sunlight during the day"

    Call Out envisages the immediate deployment of a light-buoy which inflates with contact with the water. Made from photoluminescence material, these buoys act as highly visible nodes, presenting a ready-made meeting point for survivors. Secondly, within each passenger’s lifejacket is a glow-float. Made from photoluminescence material, these buoys act as highly visible nodes, presenting ready-made meeting points for survivors. Each glow-float has a glowing deployable helium balloon. And to provide extra visibility, the top of the balloon flashes an SOS signal at night and reflects sunlight during the day.
    ‘Call Out’, the second placed winner went to Australia’s Gabriele Gunady and Sang-Il Na
    ‘Call Out’, the second placed winner went to Australia’s Gabriele Gunady and Sang-Il Na

    A pair of Australians also clinched the third prize. Mikhael Geordie Amadeus and Priscillia Sanjaya of NSW, Australia, caught the eye of the judges with a highly topical project called ‘BLASt’. The name is an acronym for Bushfire Lighting Alert System and envisages a smart streetlight system that provides a visual threat assessment to warn people of the potential risk of a bushfire.
     

    Sensors installed in the BLASt smart pole monitor local air quality, humidity, and the temperature in real-time. The environmental data is then relayed across the network and communicated to surrounding residents through a combination of LED Lights and an E-INK display. An LED strip on the body of the smart pole gives a quick indication of the threat level. Green hues indicate a low fire risk, orange indicates high, while red indicates a severe fire risk.

    Mikhael Geordie Amadeus and Priscillia Sanjaya’s BLASt took third place
    Mikhael Geordie Amadeus and Priscillia Sanjaya’s BLASt took third place 

    Knowing if a shelter is available could be the difference between life and death."

    With so many entrants, there were many deserving of a special mention. One such project was the ‘House of Hope’ by Alexandra Joița and Corina Săndescu from Romania. Their project foresees shelters made from recyclable plastic and metal, that provide overnight accommodation for homeless people. A visual clue as to whether they are available for occupancy is provided by a colored LED light. A yellow color indicates the shelter is available while a warm red hue reveals that it’s occupied. On cold winter days, when the mercury plunges to -30°C, knowing if a shelter is available could be the difference between life and death.
    An honorable mention goes to the ‘House of Hope’ by Alexandra Joița and Corina Săndescu
    An honorable mention goes to the ‘House of Hope’ by Alexandra Joița and Corina Săndescu

    The last word from the judges


    “Great to see the submissions addressing this year’s challenging thematic with innovation and some lateral thinking.”   Lee Barker Field – AECOM
     

    "The competition entries show that lighting has not only the power to delight, but also to improve, transform and save lives.”  Vesna Petrisin
     

    “The CLUE competition provides a unique perspective on lighting and social impact issues. Providing students and young professionals worldwide with a challenging brief that strives to find solutions to real world issues of importance through the application and impact of light.  Participating as a judge was an educational and rewarding process.”  Kenneth Douglas - HLB Lighting Design
     

    “Inspiring to see how the entrants used their personal perspective on emergency to inform their ideas.”  Mike Simpson, Signify
     

    “Amazing things happen when you collaborate as a team.”    Sylvia Bistrong – ISP Design

    judges
    A tough decision as the judges determine the competition winners
    I want to congratulate all the winners and thank all the participants for their creative and innovative lighting design concepts. It fills us with hope for the future. Thank you.

    About the author:

    Jaap Schuuring


    Jaap Schuuring
    Head of Customer Education, Signify

     

    Want more information? Send me an email at jaap.schuuring@signify.com.

    For further information, please contact:

    Signify Global Integrated Communications
    Neil Pattie
    Tel: + 31 6 15 08 48 17
    Email: neil.pattie@signify.com

    About Signify

     

    Signify (Euronext: LIGHT) is the world leader in lighting for professionals and consumers and lighting for the Internet of Things. Our Philips products, Interact connected lighting systems and data-enabled services, deliver business value and transform life in homes, buildings and public spaces. With 2019 sales of EUR 6.2 billion, we have approximately 32,000 employees and are present in over 70 countries. We unlock the extraordinary potential of light for brighter lives and a better world. We have been named Industry Leader in the Dow Jones Sustainability Index for three years in a row. News from Signify is located at the Newsroom, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram. Information for investors can be found on the Investor Relations page.

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